The day of the 28th, the ship began preparing for departure. This meant stripping the “save all” net and raising the gangway around 1800 as well as preparing the ship to make fast with the tugboats. After unlashing the net, the group of cadets gathered the net and folded it for easy deployment at the next port.

2nd Mate Compliance Officer observing as "save all" net is stripped

2nd Mate Compliance Officer observing as "save all" net is stripped

3Ccadets Alayna Celestine, Kayleigh Andres, Kate Dabrow smile for the camera

3C cadets Alayna Celestine, Kayleigh Andres, Kate Dabrow smile for the camera

1C cadet Jacob Matthews gathers the "save all" net

1C cadet Jacob Matthews gathers the "save all" net

Cadet throws turns off the bitt to “let go the bow line” Captain gives orders to “let go the stern lines “

Cadet throws turns off the bitt to “let go the bow line

Captain gives orders to “let go the stern lines “

 

4D DivCom Jake Schollenberg working the warping head to “heave it home”4D DivCom Jake Schollenberg working the warping head to “heave it home”

Simultaneously the bow and stern mooring lines were let go from the dock and faked on deck, so they do not get tangled when they need to be used again. On the bridge Cadet 3rd Mate Solomon Kaupu maintains the bell book, and he was also in order of the Engine Order Telegraph. The bell book is extremely important as it is a record of all orders given to the main engines from the bridge

Cadets heave the breastline home once “off the bollard”Cadets heave the breast line home once “off the bollard”

Cadets faking lines out on the foredeck Cadet 3rd Mate Solomon Kaupu at the Engine Order Telegraph, and keeping the Bell Book

Cadets faking lines out on the foredeck

Cadet 3rd Mate Solomon Kaupu at the Engine Order Telegraph, and keeping the Bell Book

 

 Foss Tug Marshall Foss Crowley Tug Protector
Foss Tug Marshall Foss

Crowley Tug Protector

After breasting off the dock with help from the tugboats donated by Foss (Marshall Foss) and the Crowley (Protector), we did a 180 degree turn and began heading out of the sound.

Communications Officer Kevin Calnan Communications Officer Kevin Calnan 

The Puget Sound Pilot guiding us out of the sound was Neil McGourty and he was a 4D Cal Maritime graduate from 2004.

20th century Captain and  21st  century Pilot reminisce over Cal Maritime, and catch up on Keelhauler Family news20th century Captain and  21st  century Pilot reminisce over Cal Maritime, and catch up on Keelhauler Family news

We will be out of the sound and out of the strait of Juan de Fuca by the time those who are not standing watch wake up in the morning. Into the North Pacific. Our next destination- The Hawaiian Islands!

View of Seattle off starboard bridge wing- goodbye Seattle!

View of Seattle off starboard bridge wing- goodbye Seattle!

ABOUT CAL MARITIME
Established in 1929, California State University Maritime Academy is the only degree-granting maritime academy on the West Coast. Located in Vallejo, California, the campus serves nearly 1,000 students and offers undergraduate degrees preparing students for careers in engineering, transportation, international relations, business, and global logistics. The new oceanography degree program launched in the fall of 2020. Cal Maritime also offers a master’s degree in Transportation and Engineering Management, as well as a number of extended learning programs and courses.