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Regulatory References

Last Updated: 02/28/2018

 


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Hazardous Materials Management Program (HMMP)

Last Updated: 8/4/2018
 
Cal Maritime follows the State of California as well as CSU Office of the Chancellor document 1039.

The laws and regulations pertaining to the use and disposal of hazardous materials and hazardous wastes are in the California Health and Safety Code, Chapters 6.5, 6.67, 6.7, 6.75, 6.95,& 6.11 and the California Code of Regulations, Title 19, Title 22, Title 23, & Title 27 found at Health and Safety Code and California Code of Regulations. Note: Training Ship Golden Bear (TSGB) is regulated under MARAD. For operations pertaining to the TSGB  -  Refer to Shoreside Administration Manual (SAM) and Vessel Operations Manual (VOM).
 
It is the policy of California State University Maritime Academy to plan and maintain, insofar as it is reasonably within its control to do so, a campus environment for faculty, staff, students, and the public that will not adversely affect their health and safety nor subject them to avoidable risks of accidental injury or illness.  University operations shall be conducted in a manner to avoid injuries or illnesses and to comply with all applicable regulations and, when appropriate, with accepted health and safety standards.  No student or employee will be required to perform any task which is determined to be unsafe or unreasonably hazardous.
 
Start here for introductory information to help you understand Cal Maritime regulations and responsibilities relating to Hazardous Materials Management.

 

   Notice: Disposal of hazardous waste using sinks, intentional evaporation, or as regular trash is against the State and Federal waste disposal law requirements


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California State University Maritime Academy (Cal Maritime)  is a unique campus of the California State University system whereby it is preparing students for careers in the fields of international business & logistics, marine engineering technology, global studies & maritime affairs, marine transportation, mechanical engineering, and facilities engineering technology. The facility stores and uses petroleum products in the form of gasoline, diesel, motor oil of various viscosities, kerosene, solvents and used oil. The facility generally receives products by common carrier and trucks. The products are stored in various drums and containers. There are no underground storage tanks (USTs) or underground piping in use at the site.
The Director of Safety and Risk Management (SRM) has adminstrative oversight and is responsible for the development, implementation, training and reporting and centralized document retention associated with the Hazardous Materials Management Program (HMMP). The Director partners with department management to ensure all team members are familiar with guidelines and regulatory requirements. To assist Cal Maritime in providing a safe, compliant, environmentally sound, and more sustainable operation, each department is expected to review, understand, and follow the guidance provided in the HMMP. The specific responsibilities for Cal Maritime staff as well as any personnel that use hazardous materials at Cal Maritime include but are not limited to: 
 
Operations with hazardous material use, storage and waste are responsible for oil discharge prevention, control, and response preparedness activities within the department facility. Department Management are to keep SRM readily informed of Departmental operational needs, including but not limited to, training, incident response and container management,  in order to effectively  support the Program.
 
Departmental Management  will coordinate with SRM to ensure that all hazardous material handling personnel as well as students are properly instructed in the operation and maintenance of hazardous material pollution prevention equipment, discharge procedure protocols, applicable pollution control laws, rules and regulations, general facility operations, and the content of this SPCC Plan.
 
Annual discharge prevention briefings are held for all personnel involved in hazardous material operations. The briefings are aimed at ensuring continued understanding and adherence to the discharge prevention procedures presented in the SPCC Plan. The briefings also highlight and describe known discharge events or failures, malfunctioning components, and recently implemented precautionary measures and best practices. 
 
Personnel will have the opportunity during the briefings to share recommendations concerning health, safety, and environmental issues encountered during facility operations. 
 
Training exercises, such as an on-site vehicular discharge, will be periodically held to prepare employees for possible discharge responses.
 
As per the State of California, Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA), businesses that handle quantities of hazardous materials /hazardous waste greater or equal to 55 gallons of liquid, 500 pounds of solids or 200 cubic feet of a compressed gas at any time are required to maintain a Hazardous Materials Business Plan, A Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures Plan as well as maintain the inventory, Emergency Response Plans and location diagrams with CERS. 
 
The HMBP program addresses the preparedness for emergency response to incidents involving hazardous materials. The HMBP includes a detailed list of the chemicals inventory or hazardous materials and their locations throughout the Campus. The HMBP is reviewed annually. http://cers.calepa.ca.gov
Any threatened or actual release that poses a potential or actual risk to people, property or the environment. 
A facility is required to report actual or threatened releases of hazardous materials to the Environmental Health and Safety Division Hazardous Materials Section as the CUPA at 707-784-6765. 8am-5pm Monday-Friday. For After-hours utilized Solano County dispatch 707-421-7090. Review the Release Reporting Regulatory Matric for more guidance.
Hazardous Waste is waste that poses substantial or potential threats to public health or the environment. In the United States, the treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Hazardous wastes are defined under RCRA in 40 CFR 261 where they are divided into two major categories: characteristic wastes and listed wastes.
 
Characteristic hazardous wastes are materials that are known or tested to exhibit one or more of the following four hazardous traits:

 

Determining Waste

UCSD  has developed a Known Hazardous and Extremely Hazardous Wastes  table that Cal Maritime can use as a reference guide. 

For other resource guides refer to: 

 

Globally Harmonized System (GHS) include a harmonized signal word, pictogram, and hazard and precaution statements for each hazard class and category.The goal of the new system is to improve worker safety and health by providing easy to understand chemical hazard and precaution information on labels, in Safety Data Sheets, and during safety training. GHS and the labeling of Chemicals and Hazardous Materials, is an international system of chemical classification, labeling, and hazard communication adopted by the United Nations in 2003. The United States participated in development of the GHS and U.S. regulatory agencies are adopting the system.

Follow the link for more information on GHS

How GHS implementation affects Cal Maritime

The revised Hazard Communication Standard incorporates internationally accepted criteria for:

  • Hazard classification – Provides specific criteria for classification of health, physical, and environmental hazards of chemicals and mixtures.
  • Labels – Chemical manufacturers and importers will be required to provide a label  that includes a harmonized signal word (either "Danger" or "Warning"), pictogram, and hazard and precaution statements for each hazard class and category.
  • Safety Data Sheets – Will now have a specified 16-section format.
  • Training and information – Employers are required to train workers by December 1, 2013 on the new label elements and safety data sheets format to facilitate recognition and understanding. Early training is important because American workers will soon begin to see GHS-compliant labels and Safety Data Sheets in the workplace.

Note: DO NOT dispose of personal waste pharmaceuticals (medications) down the drain or down the toilet. This includes any prescription or nonprescription substances intended to be swallowed, inhaled, injected, applied to the skin or eyes, or otherwise absorbed.

Universal Wastes may not be disposed of in the trash!

1. Electronic devices: Includes any electronic device that is a hazardous waste (with or without a Cathode Ray Tube (CRT)), including televisions, computer monitors, cell phones, VCRs, computer CPUs and portable DVD players.

2. Batteries: Most household-type batteries, including rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries, silver button batteries, mercury batteries, alkaline batteries and other batteries that exhibit a characteristic of a hazardous waste

3. Electric lamps: Fluorescent tubes and bulbs, high intensity discharge lamps, sodium vapor lamps and electric lamps that contain added mercury, as well as any other lamp that exhibits a characteristic of a hazardous waste. (e.g., lead).

4. Mercury-containing equipment: Thermostats, mercury switches, mercury thermometers, pressure or vacuum gauges, dilators and weighted tubing, mercury rubber flooring, mercury gas flow regulators, dental amalgams, counterweights, dampers and mercury added novelties such as jewelry, ornaments and footwear.

5. CRTs: The glass picture tubes removed from devices such as televisions and computer monitors.

6. CRT glass: A cathode ray tube that has been accidently broken or processed for recycling.

7. Pesticides: 40 CFR part 273.9 defines a pesticide as any substance or mixture of substances intended for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest, or intended for use as a plant regulator, defoliant, or desiccant.7. 

8. Non-Paint Care Products: • Paint thinners, mineral spirits, solvents • Aerosol paints (spray cans) • Auto and marine paints • Art and craft paints • Caulking compounds, epoxies, glues, adhesives • Paint additives, colorants, tints, resins • Wood preservatives (containing pesticides) • Roof patch and repair • Asphalt, tar and bitumen-based products • 2-component coatings • Deck cleaners • Traffic and road marking paints • Industrial Maintenance (IM) coatings • Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) (shop application) paints and finishes.

9. RECYCLABLE Paint-Care Products:

Interior and exterior architectural paints: latex, acrylic, water-based, alkyd, oil-based, enamel (including textured coatings) • Deck coatings, floor paints (including elastomeric) • Primers, sealers, under coaters • Stains • Shellacs, lacquers, varnishes, urethanes (single component) • Waterproofing concrete/masonry/wood sealers and repellents (not tar or bitumen-based) • Metal coatings, rust preventatives • Field and lawn paints.

Follow this link to California Paint Care for more information: California Paint Care

 
Learn to identify, label, store and dispose of hazardous waste at California State University Maritime Academy. ALL CONTAINERS MUST BE LABELED, LOGGED & FACING FORWARD
CAL MARITIME EPA ID # CAL000038228
Hazardous Waste Collection Schedule

Cal Maritime has two primary waste accumulation station locations to support Campus operations; Facilities and Waterfront.  Departments will be provided with smaller containers, not to exceed 55-gallons, to support day to day operations. Once the container is filled, and/or every 30-days, Departments are to transfer the container to the designated accumulation station. Campus waste will be picked up from the designated accumulation stations once every fiscal quarter.
 
Contact Shipping& Receiving  or the Department of Safety & Risk Management for additional containers for your department.
 

Process Management Overiew

All spills, regardless of size and severity are to be promptly reported to department management as well as the department of safety and risk management. 

Spills: 

•Must be cleaned up immediately
DO NOT leave unguarded
DO NOT push out of the door or down the drains
DO NOT mix fluids
•Antifreeze (Ethyl Glycol) is water soluble and can end up in wastewater plants, the aqua fir, or the water tables.
•Waste oil can also seep into the storm drains
•If you spill some antifreeze, clean it up immediately. Dogs, cats and other animals are attracted by the sweet smell.They cannot taste it and will die.
 
 

Contents

 All departments identified to have hazardous materials are required to have a spill kit(s) of sufficient size and capcity to support operations. Spill kits must contain certain items (listed below) in addition to equipment and supplies appropriate for the chemicals commonly used in your lab. Restock them whenever a spill occurs.

Spill kits must include:

  • Appropriate personal protective equipment which includes  gloves, coats, and goggles
  • Absorbent materials made for the chemicals or hazardous materials associated with your department operation, such as organic solvent or corrosive spill pads
  • Materials or equipment for chemicals with special handling requirements
  • Plastic bags to contain the waste
Keep batteries out of Cal Maritime trash by following the disposal procedures below. Most household-type batteries, including rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries, silver button batteries, mercury batteries, alkaline batteries and other batteries that exhibit a characteristic of a hazardous waste. Toxic heavy metals and corrosive properties of batteries make them unsuitable for disposal in the municipal trash because they can contaminate surface and ground water.
Each department is issued a container for the "househole-type batteries" so that all used batteries generated at Cal Maritime are collected by  Facility & Maintenance for recycling or disposal as hazardous waste. 
Contact Shipping& Receiving for a bin for your department.
Departments with vehicle or equipment batteries are to dispose of these in the designated hazardous materials accumulation station.
 
Typical battery uses at Cal Maritime
Cell phones, pagers, cameras, computers, flashlights, power tools, research equipment, monitoring devices, health monitors, lanterns, burglar alarms, emergency lights, and automobiles and heavy equipment.
 
Types of batteries used at Cal Maritime
Nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd)
Silver button
Mercury
Small sealed lead acid (Pb)
Alkaline
Carbon-zinc
Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH)
Lithium ion
 

Note: Only specifically designated Cal Maritime personnel are authorized to sign hazardous waste manifests for removal or disposal of asbestos or lead-containing materials from Cal Maritime facilities.

 

The Asbestos and Lead Plan are currently under final design. Check back soon. 

Disposing of over-the-counter medicine (OTC) is easy. Many community-based pharmacy "take-back" programs offer the best option; otherwise, almost all OTC medicines can be disposed of in the household trash. Consumers should take precautions, however, by reading the label to ensure OTC medicines can be disposed of in the trash. Follow these guidelines:

Recycling CAL MARITIME-generated materials

  • How to Recycle at Cal Maritime

Recycling your own stuff

Learn how to properly manage sharps

Sharps are devices or objects with corners, edges, or projections capable of cutting or piercing skin or regular waste bags. State and local laws regulate disposal of sharps to protect waste handlers from both physical and contamination hazards.

Examples of sharps include:

  • Hypodermic needles, syringes, tubing
  • Blades (scalpels, razors, Microtomes*)
  • Broken lab glassware

 

Annual Hazards Training

  • Hazardous Materials Management Training is required annually for all employees and students who work directly with hazardous materials
  • Prerequisites: Prior to participating in this annual refresher course, complete Injury and Illness Prevention Program training.
  • Periodic refresher training will be provided following any incidents, non-compliance with policies and procedures and as means of continuous improvement.

Contact the Department of Safety & Risk Management for copies of

  • Hazardous Materials Management Program
  • Hazardous Materials Business Plan
  • Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures

Follow the link to Solano County requirements

REFERENCES

  • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
  • California Health and Safety Code
  • California Code of Regulations
    • Title 8, Part 1, Chapter 9, Housing
    • Title 17, Public Health
    • Title 22, Environmental Health
    • Title 26, Department of Health Services
  • Code of Federal Regulations
  • Title 40, Environmental Protection Agency
Title 49, Transportation

EO-1039

EO-1069

Document Document # Storage
Hazardous Materials Management ProgramTBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Hazardous Communication Program
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Compressed Gas Program
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Flammable Storage Plan
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Injury Illness Prevention Program
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Hazardous Materials Business Plan
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Spill Prevention Countermeasure Control
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Emergency Operation Plan
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Personal Protective Equipment Program
TBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office
Chemical Lab Safety PlanTBDDirector of Safety and Risk Management Office

 

 


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U-CAN

Hazard Awareness Recognition Program

Submit a Safety Report
Last Updated: 09/17/2018

U-Corrective Action Notification. Accident prevention through proactive action, recognition and communication.

Report of Safe Work Practices: Demonstrates the unconditional dedication toward the protection of person and property.
Report of Safety Concerns:You are encouraged to report any and all unsafe conditions that you observe on campus by using this form. You may make your report anonymously or you can contact the Department of Safety and Risk Management directly at 707-654-1076. The Report of Safety Concerns include but are not limited to; health and safety risks (such as trip and fall hazards or unsafe conduct by employees or students), 

 


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Safety Data Sheet Look-up

Click on the icon to look-up a Safety Data Sheet


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Forms

Last Updated: 02/28/2018

 


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Training Modules & Resources

Last Updated: 02/28/2018

 

 

 

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HMMP Resources Library

Last Updated: 2/4/2017
 

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Hazardous Materials Management How-to & FAQ's

Last Update 02/28/2018

 

Aerosol cans

Cal Maritime follows  the California Health and Safety Code, Division 20, Article 9 Section 25201.16 reduces the regulatory and financial burden of managing hazardous waste aerosol cans by designating them as "universal waste." Universal waste handlers may process the cans onsite without a permit under certain conditions.

  • Aerosol cans may be hazardous wastes when they are non-empty and will no longer be used.
  • Aerosol cans are not hazardous wastes when they have been emptied of contents.

 

To determine if the container qualifies as empty or not, and how to dispose of it:

Refer to the  California Department of Toxic Substances Fact Sheet Aerosol Can Waste Management

Batteries

Keep batteries out of Cal Maritime trash by following the disposal procedures below.

 All used batteries are hazardous waste. Toxic heavy metals and corrosive properties of batteries make them unsuitable for disposal in the municipal trash because they can contaminate surface and ground water.  Each department is issued a container so that all used batteries generated at Cal Maritime are collected by  Facility & Maintenance for recycling or disposal as hazardous waste. Contact Shipping& Receiving for a bin for your department.

 

Resource Review 

Cell phones

Return unwanted cell phones to the service provider. California law requires (PDF) vendors to accept their returned products. When that's not possible, use either a cell phone collection bin on campus located at the Shipping/Receiving Warehouse.

Electronic devices or e-waste

To dispose of monitors, televisions, and other electronic devices owned by Cal Maritime;

Electronic devices that must be disposed of as hazardous waste include:

  •  Any electronic device
  • Calculators
  • Compact disc players and recorders
  • Computers and computer peripherals
  • Some appliances such as microwave ovens, air conditioners, and furnaces
  • Radios, stereo equipment, and phonographs
  • Tape players and recorders
  • Telephones, cell phones, and answering machines
  • Televisions and monitors, including cathode ray tubes (CRTs), plasma screens, and liquid crystal displays (LCDs)
  • Thermostats, relays, switches, and gauges
  •  Video cassette players and recorders

Fluorescent bulbs, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps

  • Keep the container closed when waste is not being added.
  • Request a hazardous waste collection from Shipping & Receiving. 

Privately owned universal wastes

Residents on campus and in affiliated campus housing will find information for the proper disposal of privately owned universal wastes on the following Web sites:

 

By law, hazardous waste containers must be properly labeled for storage, transportation, and disposal.

A Cal Maritime  hazardous waste tag stating ownership, accumulation start date, contents, and hazards of the waste must be securely attached to your waste container before waste is added.

  • Label chemical, radioactive, mixed chemical-radioactive, and universal waste containers with a Cal Maritime hazardous waste tag.
  • Biohazardous waste that has no chemical or radioactive contamination must be labeled directly on the red biosafety bag or sharps container containing the waste. A Cal Maritime hazardous waste tag is not used.

 

Refer to :

Container Management At A Glance

Container Label At A Glance

Waste Pickup

  • Cal Maritime will have its hazardous waste collected by a designated vender every quarter.
  • Departments are responsible for ensuring their satellite accumulations are transferred to the primary accumulations stations located at Facilities or the Waterfront when their designated container is full.
  • Departments are NOT to exceed a 55-gallon container of waste at any one time prior to transferring to primary stations. 
  •  
 

Follow the steps below to decide if your material is a chemical waste, and if it is hazardous or extremely hazardous.

If you have an unknown chemical or can't answer a question in the steps below, contact the Department of Safety & Risk Management, (707) 654-1076.

 

Rule of thumb: If the waste material has a Safety Data Sheet, and you would be reluctant to eat, drink, or wear the material, it is probably a hazardous waste per California regulations.

1. Determine if the chemical is a "waste."

Anything that meets the following criteria is a waste and must be handled according to applicable local, state, and federal regulations. Regularly check chemical inventories for material that is:

  • Spent material
  • Unusable because it doesn't meet its required specifications
  • Past its expiration date
  • Unlabeled, and has been unlabeled for more than 10 days
  • Abandoned
  • A container that once held chemicals
  • Unwanted and intended to be discarded or recycled

2. Determine if the chemical is an "extremely hazardous" waste.

Check the UCSD list of Known Hazardous and Extremely Hazardous Wastes.

If your chemical waste is not listed, continue to questions below.

Answer the questions below:

Has it been shown through experience or testing that human exposure to the waste or material my likely result in death, disabling personal injury or serious illness because of the carcinogenicity, high acute or chronic toxicity, bio-accumulative properties, or persistence in the environment of the waste or material?

Solids can go in the regular trash. DO NOT attempt to dissolve powders or salts and dispose of them in the drain. 

Is the flashpoint less than or equal to 140°F or 60°C?

Is the waste an ignitable compressed gas?

Will it release oxygen when reacting with another chemical?

Is it a liquid with pH less than or equal to 2, or greater than or equal to 12.5?

Will it aggressively corrode steel?

Is it normally unstable or subject to violent change?

Is it a cyanide- or sulfide-bearing waste that can create toxic gases, vapors, or fumes when exposed to pH conditions between 2 and 12.5?

Does it have an acute oral LD50 less than 2,500 milligram per kilogram?

Does it have an acute inhalation LC50 less than 10,000 ppm as a gas or vapor?

Has the material shown through experience or testing to pose a hazard to human health or the environment because of its carcinogenicity (carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen), acute toxicity, chronic toxicity, bio-accumulative properties, or persistence in the environment?

 Note: Never work alone when hazardous chemicals are involved.

Report all spills regardless of size or severity to department management as well as the department of safety and risk management.  

1. Plan and prepare for spill response.

  • Post the Campus Emergency Guide Poster and have a Campus Emergency Pocket Guidebook readily accessible. Make sure lab personnel read and understand the chemical spill response procedures.
    • If the chemicals in your lab require specific instructions not listed in the Emergency Guide, establish standard operating procedures for special conditions in your facility.
    • Make sure everyone working in the lab reads and understands the procedures.
  • Assemble a spill kit, tailored to clean up small spills of chemicals commonly used in your lab.
    • Keep it fully stocked and easily accessible.
    • Train personnel how to use its contents and when it is safe to clean up a spill.
  • Make sure everyone working in the lab knows:
    • Locations of fire extinguishers and manual pull stations, eye washes, emergency showers, and telephones
    • How to operate the fire extinguisher  and when it's safe to do so
    • How to use the eye wash and emergency shower

2. Evacuate

Large or extremely dangerous spills

  • Spills that present an immediate hazard (fire, explosion, chemical exposure, etc.)
  • Any spill of highly dangerous chemicals
  • Moderate or large-scale chemical spills

If the spill is large or if you're unsure how to classify it, call for help. See Step 3.

Small, incidental spills

Incidental spills are those that are contained and have a spill quantity of less than 5-gallons. 

Spills that can be cleaned up by personnel without putting themselves or others in danger.

If you're confident  staff can handle the spill safely, go to Step 4

3. Clean up small spills safely.

For large or dangerous spills, call for help and follow chemical spill procedures.

  • Call SRM Hazardous Materials Response:
    • Call (707) 654-1076 during business hours.
    • After hours, call Campus Police at (707) 654-1111
  • Follow the Campus Emergency Pocket Guidebook  instructions for major chemical spills:
    • Avoid breathing vapors.
    • Quickly identify the spilled material if you can do so safely.
    • If the spill involves a flammable liquid, turn off all ignition sources if you can do so safely.
    • Alert people in the area and evacuate, closing all doors.
    • If someone has been splashed with chemicals, flush the affected area with water for at least 15 minutes. Call Poison Control, (800) 222-1222, for advice and seek medical attention as recommended.
    • Keep people away from the spill area until  responders arrive. Lock doors and post warning signs.
    • Have someone available who is knowledgeable about the spilled material to provide information to  responders.

4. Clean up small spills safely.

If you're confident staff can safely handle the spill, follow these procedures:

Alert people in the area.

Avoid breathing vapors and try to determine what spilled.

Wear personal protective equipment including safety goggles, gloves, and if spill is in the chemistry lab a long-sleeved lab coat during cleanup.

Confine the spill to a small area. Use a commercial kit or absorbent material from your spill kit to absorb spilled materials.

Label the container with a hazardous waste label and include it in the next hazardous waste collection.

Clean the spill area with water.

Replenish your spill kit supplies, so the kit is ready when you need it.

If someone has been splashed with chemicals, immediately flush the affected area with water for at least 15 minutes. Call Poison Control, (800) 222-1222, and seek medical attention as recommended.

 

 

Sharps are devices or objects with corners, edges, or projections capable of cutting or piercing skin or regular waste bags. State and local laws regulate disposal of sharps to protect waste handlers from both physical and contamination hazards.

Examples of sharps include:

  • Hypodermic needles, syringes, tubing
  • Blades (scalpels, razors, Microtomes*)
  • Broken lab glassware
  • Microscope slides
  • Glass capillary tubes

Training

Get trained before using sharp devices. Improper use and poor technique can increase your risk of a sharps exposure or other injuries. Receive proper training from senior personnel on techniques and equipment specific to your lab setting before conducting a procedure involving biological or other hazardous materials.

Storage and Use

When applicable:

  • Secure sharps with a magnet
  • Store razor blades in a petri dish
  • Put needles into cork and do not recap needles
  • Avoid placing sharps on the bench
  • Store a sharps waste container near where the sharps are generated.

Disposal

Separating sharps by type of contamination is required by law.

For disposal purposes, there are 4 kinds of sharps:

  • Non-contaminated (except needles, syringes and lancets)
  • Biohazardous (includes non-contaminated needles, syringes, and lancets)
  • Chemically contaminated
  • Radioactive

Whether contaminated or not, specific packaging and container restrictions apply. Follow specific disposal procedures below.

Non-contaminated

These sharps must be free of any biohazard, chemical, or radioactive contamination.

Container

Remove or deface any labels or biohazard symbols that may be on the container.

Store/Use

Carefully place sharps in the container in an orderly fashion.

Sharps cannot extend above the "fill" line.

Disposal

Place the sealed container in the regular trash.

Note: Custodial staff will not collect boxes of broken glass weighing more than 50 pounds.

Biohazardous

·         Review the Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines for sharps

·         Container


Sharps box with biohazard symbol

  • Store/Use

Sharps cannot extend above the "fill" line.

·         Disposal

o    Select a rigid, leak-proof, puncture-resistant container. Containers sold on Marketplace fit most needs.

·         Labeling

o    Remove or deface any other labels or biohazard symbols on the container.

·         Store/Use

o    Deactivate any infectious agents on sharps before placing them in the container.

o    Do not place liquids, such as full syringes, in sharps containers.

o    When the container is full, transfer to the designated hazardous waste accumulation station locations.

Disposal of empty hazardous material containers is strictly regulated. The disposal method depends on the container size, what it is made of, and the hazardous material it once contained.

Refer to :

Container Management At A Glance

Container Label At A Glance

1. Was the material "hazardous" or "extremely hazardous"?

Determine whether the hazardous material the container once held was an extremely hazardous waste:

Refer to UCSD list of Known Hazardous and Extremely Hazardous Wastes to determine if the materials are listed as "extremely hazardous waste."

  • If the material IS listed as extremely hazardous waste,  contact the department of safety and risk management for handling protocols and immediate hazardous waste colection.
  • DO NOT rinse.

2. Confirm the container is really empty.

A container is "empty" when all of the following conditions are met:

Liquid hazardous material containers:

  • There is no hazardous material remaining that can feasibly be removed.
  • The interior surface is scraped clean, with no residual material.

Aerosol containers:

The spray mechanism is in place and functional.

Gas cylinders:

Take cylinder to the designated hazardous waste accumulation station located at Facilities or the Waterfront.

If the container qualifies as "empty," go to Step 3.

If the container DOES NOT qualify as empty and cannot be emptied into a compatible hazardous waste receptacle, then the container and its contents must be collected and disposal as hazardous waste.

The container must be dated and collected quarterly

Keep the container closed and cross out labels. (Don't obliterate the original product label; staff may need to see what was in the container.)

Place the deisnged container for your building to be collected by Facilities & Maintenance Recycling personnel.

Capacity of less than or equal to 5 gallons (glass, plastic, or metal):

Dispose of the container in the regular trash.

Keep latex paint out of Cal Maritime trash and sewers by following disposal instructions below.

Although less toxic than oil-based paint, water-based latex paint can still harm the environment. Latex paint and rinse water from cleaning latex paint equipment must be disposed of as hazardous waste.

Liquid latex paint cannot be disposed of in the regular trash, poured down sewer or storm drains, or dumped on the ground.

Follow these instructions when washing glassware, containers, and equipment.

For other drain disposal questions, see

Empty paint containers and used applicators are not hazardous waste and can go in the regular trash if they meet the following criteria:

Containers: No paint pours out when it is held upside down, and any remaining paint is completely dry.

In California, it is illegal to dispose of latex paint in the trash or down storm drains or sewer drains. According to the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC),* it is also illegal to air dry or mix small amounts of latex paint with any substance for the purpose of solidifying it and disposing of it because this practice is considered "treatment of a hazardous waste." However, if latex paint has naturally dried out, it may be disposed of in the trash.

Brushes, rollers, and other applicators: All remaining paint is dry.

See Latex Paint Hazards and Solutions for Disposal for more information

Minimize waste

  • Buy only what you need.
  • Store cans upside down with the lids secured.
  • Use leftover paint on another project.
  • Reuse applicators when possible.
  • Donate useable surplus paint to designated PaintCare facilities.

For oil paint, thinner, and solvent disposal, read How to Store and Dispose of Hazardous Chemical Waste.

Learn how to dispose of wash and rinse water contaminated with hazardous materials or highly toxic, acidic, or caustic cleaning solutions.

Follow these instructions when washing glassware, containers, and equipment.

For other drain disposal questions, see Sewer Disposal: What Can Go Down the Drain?

Determine what Can it go down the drain?

Determine if wash and rinse water must be collected as hazardous waste or can go down the drain.

Wash and rinse water can go down drains if it is:

1.       Nonhazardous

  • No untreated biohazardous waste
  • No solids, sludges, or viscous substances

3.       Non-disruptive to sewage treatment operations

No grease or oil

Chromerge

Sulfuric acid

Phosphoric acid wash solutions

Avoid using these solutions if possible.

  • Collect highly caustic, acidic, or toxic wash water by emptying it into the hazardous waste storage container.

Additional rinses can go down the drain.

Dispose of the hazardous waste.

Dispose of the hazardous waste storage containers:

Label the container with a hazardous waste label.

 

Learn how to contain, store, and dispose of extremely hazardous chemical waste at CSU Maritime Academy

In the right place? These procedures are for extremely hazardous chemical waste only.

·         Radioactive waste, see How To Store and Dispose of Radioactive Waste.

·         Biohazardous waste, see How to Package and Dispose of Biohazardous and Medical Waste.

Follow these procedures for selecting containers and safely storing extremely hazardous chemical waste until it is collected by Environment, Health & Safety (EH&S).

Is it "hazardous" or "extremely hazardous"?

Procedures and requirements are different for hazardous and extremely hazardous chemical waste.

·         Check the list of Known Hazardous and Extremely Hazardous Wastes for your material.

o    If your material is listed as hazardous — not extremely hazardous — proceed to How to Store and Dispose of Hazardous Chemical Waste.

Designate a hazardous waste storage area

·         Select an area that is:

o    Under the control of lab personnel

o    Choose a container chemically compatible with the material it will hold. Chemicals must not react with, weaken, or dissolve the container or lid.

o    Read Chemical Compatibility Guidelines for more detailed information.

·         Caps and closure:

o    If necessary, transfer waste material to a container that can be securely closed. Label the new container.

o    Wipe down containers prior to your scheduled collection date.

·         Size:

o    Always place your container in a secondary container to:

o    Capture spills and leaks from the primary container

o    Segregate incompatible hazardous wastes, such as acids and bases

o    Request these secondary containers from the Shipping and Receiving.

Tag every waste container

·         Attach a completed hazardous waste tag to the container before you begin using the container to accumulate and store waste.

·         Cross out all other labels on the container. Do not obliterate the original product label; waste technicians need to see what the container held before it was designated as a waste receptacle.

Liquid waste

·         Do not overfill liquid waste containers. Leave a sizable amount of head space in the container to allow for expansion and safe transportation 10% head space is a good rule of thumb.

·         Do not mix solids with liquid waste. Containers found to contain solids during processing by hazardous waste technicians will be returned to the generator for separation. See guidelines for solid chemical waste below.

·         Liquid-filled small containers such as vials and Eppendorf tubes:

o    Containers bagged together must contain liquids or liquid mixtures with the same chemical constituents.

o    Accurately list the bag's contents and chemical constituents on the hazardous waste tag.

·         Organic solvents:

o    Do not combine organic solvents with toxic metal waste!

o    Double-bag the waste in clear plastic bags to allow visual inspection by waste technicians. If contents cannot be visually inspected, waste cannot collect the bag.

o    Accurately list the bag's contents and chemical constituents on the hazardous waste tag.

·         Dry chemicals:

o    Label the container with a hazardous waste tag.

·         Sharps: Sharps are items capable of puncturing, piercing, or tearing regular waste bags. Examples include pipettes, pipette tips, needles, scalpels, razor blades, and broken glass. Sharps require special packaging.

o    When 1 quart or more of extremely hazardous waste accumulates, the waste must be collected within 3 days.

 

Advancing Our Mission through Sustainable Operations

Zero Waste by 2025 is the goal that each campus is working towards through implementing the hierarchy of reduce, reuse recycle.

The  Campus Sustainability Plan (CSP) articulates an overarching vision that will make everything we do more sustainable, from reducing energy and water consumption, to limiting the waste that we generate, to changing what we buy, to altering how we manage facilities.

The GCP defines a collective vision and a long-term strategic plan for sustainable management of CSU operations. A critical component of the implementation of the GCP will be informing and engaging students, staff, visitors, and community partners about climate change and sustainability to broaden opportunities to foster change

To succeed, we must also think and act on a scale that extends beyond the Campus boundaries. We must collaborate with and learn from our partners, concessioners, and surrounding communities. We must explain our approach to sustainability in ways that engage the global community. And we must share our successes to foster environmental stewardship far beyond our borders.

For more information see our Sustainability Management Plan

What is Recyclable?

Non-Hazardous Waste:

Step 1: COMPOST Step 2: RECYCLE Step 3: LANDFILL

COMPOST

·         ALL FOOD

·         ALL NAPKINS

·         Compostable Containers

·         Compostable Drink Cups

·         Compostable Coffee Cups

RECYCLE

·         Bottles and Cans

·         Glass and Metal

·         Paper

·         Plastic Containers

·         Plastic Utensils

LANDFILL

·         Plastic Bags

·         Chip Bags

·         Candy Wrappers

·         Plastic Bags

·         Thin Film Plastics

     ·         Styrofoam

 

 


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